The Gardens at Twin Hickory

4700 The Gardens Drive, Glen Allen, VA 23059
Call: 888-621-8872 (804) 364-3649 Email UsTheGardens.CommunityWebsite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

The Gardens at Twin Hickory Blog

Virginia is 9 on List of Top Ten Best States

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, April 17, 2018

The Gardens at Twin Hickory Apartments, Glen Allen, VAMost Americans do not choose where they grow up and often end up living in the same place as adults, either for financial reasons or because of social and familial connections. Still, many Americans choose to pack up and move to a new state — usually in search of better life.

People who contemplate such a move would certainly consider a state’s overall quality of life. While every person is different and may weigh certain factors more than others, quality of life generally consists of a multitude of factors, including an area’s economy, jobs market, income levels, poverty, crime, education levels, health care, transportation, and whether the area is generally desirable.

Based on these factors and others, 24/7 Wall St. ranked all 50 states for overall quality of life.

9. Virginia

  • 10-yr. population change: +10.1% (21st largest increase)
  • Annual unemployment: 4.0% (tied — 14th lowest)
  • Poverty rate: 11.0% (tied — 12th lowest)
  • Life expectancy at birth: 79.1 years (25th shortest)

Problems with crime tend to be local rather than statewide, but across Virginia crime tends to be low and the state is relatively crime free compared to most of the country. There were just 217 violent crimes reported in the state for every 100,000 residents, nearly half the national figure of 397 incidents per 100,000 people.

Virginians are also among the most likely to have a college degree, which often results in higher incomes and better quality of life across a population. Just over 38% of Virginia adults have a bachelor’s degree, compared to 31.3% of adults nationwide. This high educational attainment rate may help explain Virginia’s relatively low unemployment rate. Last year, average unemployment was 4.0%, well below the national average rate of 4.9%.

For more information on apartments in Glen Allen, VA contact The Gardens

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247wallst.com


More Seniors are Choosing to Rent, Here's Why

Joseph Coupal - Monday, April 09, 2018

The Gardens at Twin Hickory Apartments, Glen Allen, VAAn interesting phenomenon among seniors who are selling their home is their changing attitude about buying another. Younger home sellers are typically focused on quickly buying another home. Their lifestyle has changed and they need to sell and buy another.

Most senior sellers will become senior homebuyers but there is an increasing trend among seniors selling their home: They don’t intend to buy another home and they are making the decision to rent.

“I think we’ll rent for a while” is an increasing response to my question: “Have you thought about your next home?”

Rent? Here are folks who have worked hard all their lives to pay off the mortgage so that they could enjoy retirement in their own home and now they want to rent?

Isn’t renting for the economically challenged, the young millennials, the unstable? Why throw money away renting when equity-rich seniors can sell and buy the home of their dreams?

The homeownership rate for seniors has been declining for the last 10 years as an increasing percentage chose to rent rather than own a home. A recent national survey of seniors who rent were asked the question: Why?

One-out-of-ten planned to buy a home within the next 6 to 12 months, about half could not afford to buy but four-out-of-ten responding seniors who could afford to buy, won’t. They’re content to remain tenants.

Why do you suppose more seniors are choosing to rent than own?

Replacement home too costly

Most seniors who are selling say that they would like to downsize into another, perhaps smaller, single-level home, closer to shopping, medical facilities and family. We have homes meeting that description in our county but they are usually higher in price than the market value of a senior’s existing home.

If family is in the region, perhaps relocating to another state is not an option. Faced with reinvesting all their sale proceeds and perhaps the obligation of a new mortgage, many choose not to sell their home or if they sell, they will rent.

Demands of homeownership

Often seniors don’t have the same physical strength at 60 as they did at 40. Some seniors are physically unable to maintain, remodel or repair everything that’s routinely necessary.

Rural properties require even more attention. Whether clearing brush or mowing the back yard, it takes good health and energy to maintain a home.

Renting is cheaper

Despite what the real estate community would have you believe, every homeowner knows that at the end of the day it’s more expensive to own a home than rent one.

Absent a mortgage, homes are still expensive to maintain. Ask anyone who has had to replace a leaking roof, a new HVAC system or replace a deck.

Retirees likely have less income than when they were working and many depend upon Social Security as their primary source of income to pay household expenses. Renting may not be the lifestyle they would prefer but it is one that they can afford.

Been there, done that

While some seniors enjoy puttering around their home with projects and working in their yard or garden, many don’t. They have spent a lifetime tied to their homes with the responsibilities of ownership while their friends have been vacationing. These seniors do not want another long-term commitment to a home. As tenants, mobility finally becomes an option.

Fear of another real estate bubble

Most of our grandparents never psychologically recovered from the Great Depression. They became compulsive savers, skeptical of debt and leery of investing in the stock market.

The 2008 Great Recession and the collapse of home values left a similar impression on many retirees. They have personally experienced how quickly the value of their home can disappear. They have watched helpless as friends and neighbors lost their home to foreclosures. They know first-hand that the real estate market has up and down cycles and they are not going to get caught in another.

There are 75 million baby boomers who are on the verge of retirement. For the next 20 years an average of 10,000 people each day will reach age 65, which has historically been the retirement phase of life. What’s fascinating is after a lifetime of homeownership more are choosing to rent.

For more information on apartments in Glen Allen, VA contact The Gardens.

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Mountain Democrat


Glen Allen is One of the Best Places To Live In Virginia… And Why

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, April 04, 2018

The Gardens at Twin Hickory Apartments, Glen Allen, VALately, there have been a lot of “best of” lists going around. These lists highlight the best overall places to live in Virginia, best small towns, best cities, etc. And with so many lists out there – and so many of them using different criteria – we decided to do a little research for ourselves. What we found was the 15 towns and cities that have gained national and statewide recognition from leading organizations like Forbes and USA Today. The resulting list is what we like to call “the best of the best.”

And so without further ado, we give you Glen Allen. Our city landed on The 15 “Best of the Best” Places to Live in Virginia list. And here is why…

Glen Allen in Henrico County received Nerdwallet.com’s vote for best place to raise a family. This Richmond City suburb was chosen for its affordability, great schools and overall prosperity. Glen Allen offers urban conveniences, but a slower pace of life and undeveloped spaces, like Crump Park shown here, make it perfect for families. With 3 Fortune 500 companies located here, the future looks bright, indeed, for Glen Allen.

For more information on apartments in Glen Allen, VA contact The Gardens at Twin Hickory.

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Only In Your State


High Home Prices Makes Renting Look Better

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, March 27, 2018

The Gardens at Twin Hickory Apartments, Glen Allen, VMillennials locked out of the housing market have this consolation: House prices have shot up so quickly that the financial advantage of being a homeowner is fast eroding in many cities.

While it’s still a better deal to buy in some cities, the economic benefit has narrowed to the point that in some places, for some households, the decision to rent or buy a home may be too close to call.

The shift has come because home prices and interest rates have risen recently, while rents have largely stagnated.

The difference between owning and renting has narrowed sharply from last year, when owners were paying roughly 41% less than renters. Add in that many apartment communities have additional amenities that you would pay for if you owned a home as well as eliminating the time spent on home maintenance.

In some popular cities, moreover, the homeowner advantage is close to being erased.

While mortgage rates have remained low since the 2008 financial crisis, rates around 7% are much closer to the historical norm. Federal Reserve officials, whose control of short-term interest rates gives them some sway over mortgage prices, expect those short-term rates to rise roughly two to three percentage points over the next few years.

It is absolutely cheaper to rent than buy when you plan to stay in a home for just a couple of years.

For more information on apartments in Glen Allen, VA contact The Gardens.

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Time- Money


The Rent or Buy Debate Doesn't Make Sense

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 19, 2018

The Gardens at Twin Hickory Apartments, Glen Allen, VAWhen you buy a home, you pay for things you don’t have to pay for as a renter: loan interest, property taxes, insurance, and even maintenance and repair costs. That’s part of the argument in favor of renting: there are so many additional costs and factors that get overlooked. That goes for both sides, though, and the details vary depending on the situation. Here are a few commonly overlooked factors that make up the specifics.

  • How long you’ll live in the home: This varies depending on the market, but in general, the longer you’re in the home, the better, because your costs are spread out over time.
  • The cost of housing in your area: In most cases, people rent because houses are just too expensive, but it all depends on the market in your area. If renting is extremely costly in your area, it might be more affordable to buy a home.
  • The opportunity cost of your taxes and insurance: What kind of long-term return could you get if you invested this money instead, in the stock market, a CD, or even a “high interest” savings account?
  • The opportunity cost of your down payment: Similarly, how much of a return could you get if you invested that lump sum instead?

It’s impossible to say renting or buying is a better decision because each one of these factors (and more) depends on your unique situation. You have to consider where you live, what kind of house you’re looking for, how much you pay in rent, how much you’ll pay in the future...the list goes on and on.

A Rent vs. Buy calculator is a great tool for simplifying these complexities, depending on your own individual specifics. Still, a calculator can only do so much. It might tell you the better long-term decision on paper, but that still doesn’t mean it’s the best decision for you.

Your Home is a Purchase, Not an Investment

Most experts agree that you shouldn’t think of your primary home as an investment. Contrary to popular belief, real estate barely outpaces inflation over time. Sure, you could time the market, flip a house, or buy a rental, but that’s different from expecting your primary home to earn you a sweet return. The investing myth is another valid argument against buying. Many people buy homes they can’t afford or stretch their finances to pay for expensive home projects because they buy into this myth.

The bottom line is: sometimes it’s smarter to rent, and sometimes buying can work in your favor. Rather than giving in to one side or another, it’s more helpful to learn the rules, crunch the numbers, then do what works—and feels right—for you.

For more information on apartments in Glen Allen, VA, contact The Gardens.

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Excerpts: twocents.lifehacker.com


Virginia, On the List of 10 Best States To Live for 2018

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 12, 2018

The Gardens at Twin Hickory Apartments, Glen Allen, VAWe used science and data to determine which U.S. states have it made.

Do you live in one of the best states in America?

You might think people across the nation like to think they live in the best place in the country. After all, you wouldn’t spend your lives somewhere that you truly didn’t love. Right? Not always. In fact, according to a Pew Research Center study not too long ago determined that almost half of Americans would rather live somewhere else than they do now.

Well, if you’re in one of the states we’re about to highlight, odds are you don’t want to go anywhere.

The purpose of this study is to use science to determine which of our great American states are the absolute best. While unbiased, this research does take into account factors that almost all Americans would agree are desirable. Therefore, while you may have strong opinions either way, you can’t argue against the methodology.

After analyzing all 50 U.S. states, we came up with this list as the 10 best states in our nation for 2018:

  1. New Hampshire
  2. Massachusetts
  3. Connecticut
  4. New Jersey
  5. Virginia
  6. Vermont
  7. Hawaii
  8. Minnesota
  9. Maryland
  10. Rhode Island

How we crunched the numbers for the best states of 2018

We threw a lot of criteria at this one in order to get the best, most complete results possible. Using FBI crime data and the most recent ACS 2012-2016, this is the criteria we used:

  • Population Density (The higher the better)
  • Lowest Unemployment Rates
  • High Median Income
  • High Home Values
  • Levels of College Education
  • A lot of insured people
  • Low Crime
  • No poverty

We then ranked each state from 1 to 50 for the criteria with a #1 ranking being the best for the particular criteria.

Next, we averaged the rankings into one “Best Place To Live Index”.

Finally, we ranked every state on the “Best Place To Live Index” with the lowest index being the Best State To Live in America for 2018.

For more information on apartments in Glen Allen, VA contact The Gardens.

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homesnacks.net


Richmond, VA: Retirement is Affordable, Healthcare is Excellent, and Life is Good

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 05, 2018
  • Retirement is something to think about years before you get there.
  • Choosing the best place to retire in the US means weighing affordability, quality of life, activities, and healthcare.
  • WalletHub ranked the best US cities to live in retirement.
  • Many of the top cities are in states with warm weather.

The Gardens at Twin Hickory Apartments, Glen Allen, VADeciding where to live in retirement may be one of the last major financial decisions you'll make, and picking the right spot is important.

WalletHub set out to put worried minds at ease. The site used available data for the 150 largest US cities to find the best and worst places to lay your hat. We already looked at the worst cities for retirement, so let's take a look at the opposite: the best urban areas to live in your post-working life.

How people spend time when they don't have to go to the office every day tends to be a little different. Many dream of hours full of painting and golf, but there are more practical considerations to keep in mind too.

Along with the weather and nearby museums and tennis courts, reliable, accessible healthcare and affordable housing are important benchmarks when determining where to live in retirement.

WalletHub found that the cities below offered a great quality of life, good healthcare, and plentiful activities — all at an affordable cost.

WalletHub scored each city based on affordability, activities, quality of life, and healthcare. The four categories were weighted equally, and each city was given a total score and then ranked, with the highest overall score designating the best city. WalletHub used data for only the city, not the surrounding metro area.

We've included the total score (out of a possible 100), with a higher score denoting a better place to live, as well as its ranking out of 150 cities for each of the four categories, with a lower number being better.

27. Richmond, VA

  • Total score (out of 100): 52.80

Rankings (out of 150 cities):

  • Affordability: 38
  • Activities: 22
  • Quality of life: 139
  • Healthcare: 33

For more information on apartments in Richmond, VA contact The Gardens.

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Business Insider


Richmond is a "Best Place to Live and Retire" in the US

Joseph Coupal - Monday, February 26, 2018

The Gardens at Twin Hickory Apartments, Glen Allen, VATo identify the best places to retire, U.S. News analyzed data for the 100 largest metropolitan areas in the USA to assess how well they meet Americans' retirement needs and expectations. Top criteria include the happiness of local residents, housing affordability, tax rates and healthcare quality.

U.S. News also analyzed 100 metro areas in the United States to find the best places to live based on quality of life and the job market in each metro area, as well as the value of living there and people's desire to live there.

Richmond, Virginia is ranked:

#24 in Best Places to Live

#32 in Best Places to Retire

If you're looking for a place to spend your golden years or a place to move to now, why wouldn't you consider Richmond, VA. For more information on apartments in Glen Allen, VA contact Richmond, VA.

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US News- Travel


Richmond VA is An Affordable City for Great Living

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, February 20, 2018

The Gardens at Twin Hickory Apartments, Glen Allen, VAThe Commonwealth of Virginia is nicknamed the "Mother of Presidents" as eight U.S. presidents have been born there, more than any other state. And though the state may be relatively small—it’s the thirty-fifth largest and twelfth most populous—it features five distinct geographic regions, giving the state broad appeal across a wide range of demographics. In other words, whether you want to live in a big city or rural area, or prefer the beach or the mountains, there’s something for everyone in Virginia.

The cities that made the list of most affordable cities in this state are not necessarily the cheapest cities in Virginia, but are carefully chosen based upon budget-friendly and quality-of-life data points, in order to offer residents the best possible combination of livability and affordability.

4. Richmond

Residents of the capital of Virginia enjoy reasonable housing costs, not to mention below average transportation costs. Richmond is home to eight Fortune 500 companies and countless other major employers.

A wide variety of housing types are available in city, suburban, and rural locations, and there are more than a few unique neighborhoods, including Church Hill and the Fan District, the latter one of the largest designated historic residential areas in the United States. Residents also enjoy easy access to the nation’s capital and several other major cities, as well as beaches and the Blue Ridge Mountains. The climate offers four distinct seasons, though winters are notably mild, thanks to the waters of Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Richmond also features more than its share of exceptionally walkable neighborhoods, in particular those in the vicinity of Virginia Commonwealth University.

For more information on apartments in Richmond, VA contact The Gardens.

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livability.com


To Rent Or To Buy?

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, February 15, 2018

The Gardens at Twin Hickory Apartments, Glen Allen, VAAs the spring real estate market of 2018 begins to spin into action, and a whole new set of home seekers contemplates entering, there is no single greater question asked than whether it's more cost effective to continue renting, or to buy, a home of their own.

When faced with the decision to rent or buy, many would-be-homeowners find that the answer will depend on three things: their market, where they choose to live, and whether they like to do home improvement and maintenance projects themselves.

Not all housing markets are the same.

How far the dollar goes in a market may make the decision for the buyer as to whether they buy. In a market where there are a lot of $100,000 homes for sale, there will be more qualified buyers, rather than in a market where the average price point is 10 times that amount.

Many new homeowners underestimate the amount of home improvement and maintenance projects (and their associated costs) that are part of homeownership, especially if they've historically been renters. Gone are the days of calling the landlord when the water heater decides to leak, or the driveway needs to be repaved.

When it's their house, they're responsible for the repairs and upkeep. If they like to complete home improvement and maintenance projects, or if they've already decided that they'll be hiring someone to assist with those things, being comfortable with the responsibility (or not) will have would-be buyers leaning one way or another as it relates to renting or buying.

Finally, many home seekers will find that the actual costs of monthly rents and monthly mortgage payments for a single-family home are at an equilibrium in any given area. The challenge for them lies in not having the funds available for a decent down payment, or a low credit score, that hinders their ability to qualify for a mortgage that tips the scales in favor of renting over buying.

Rent or buy, knowing their market, the type of inventory available for rent or purchase in their area, and recognizing that homeownership will translate into home improvement and maintenance projects, should be part of the thought process when home seekers contemplate their next move.

For more information on apartments in Glen Allen, VA contact The Gardens.

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Hartford Currant



The Gardens at Twin Hickory

4700 The Gardens Drive, Glen Allen, VA 23059

Call: 888-621-8872
Email UsTheGardens.CommunityWebsite.HHHunt@aptleasing.info
View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$1,049-$1,481